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Extra resources
The thesis from which some of it is drawn, and where you can get references.

Get it from Amazon.com.au or Amazon.com

From the back cover:
What does it mean for humans to accept that we are not the centre of life, but continue to worship God in a tradition which has assumed that we are?

How do we worship the God of this evolving life? A God who is ancient. Personal but not human. As much female as male. The God who is beyond us, became one with us (and, many Christians claim, one of us), and who remains within and amongst us?

We are not fallen, the Earth is not cursed. So why is it so hard to get babies out, and why are there so many weeds?

We have original needs, not original sin. So why do we sin? How does our new understanding of our brain and its evolution help us answer this, and what do we do about it?

Are we inherently selfish and violent? Is our niceness merely a thin veneer over our brutish insides?

Does Jesus win victory over evolution, or call us back into life: this awesome evolving life of which we are a part?

What do we make of the whole story of Easter, seen through the eyes of a God who loves other animals as much as us, and never asked for ritual
sacrifices of the innocent? What did Jesus make of Easter?

Why are we here? Is there an “after here?”
What do post-Darwinian Christians make of sex? Is heterosexual, lifelong marriage the only context in which God blesses nookie? What surprises do
we find in the Biblical Witnesses themselves?


Jason has spent the last decade bringing his early studies in - and love of- zoology
and genetics into conversation with the Christian faith he adopted in his twenties.
After ordination and a first placement as a university chaplain, he completed a PhD
in “biocentric theology.” A couple of years of “ecoministry” followed, including starting and ministering with an ecofaith worshipping community in Adelaide. This book captures some of his decade long conversation, one that he expects to be having until his (hopefully far off) death.

He recently moved to Bellingen, NSW, with his family to minister with the Uniting Church congregation there, and work as an ecominister in the wider presbytery.